Guide on growing the delicious, nutritious Spagetti squash. Includes sun requirements, when to plant in your area, and tips for harvesting a bountiful crop.

Soil

What soil is good for Spagetti Squash?

 Rich, well draining soil with plenty of compost mixed in.

Position

How much sun does Spagetti Squash need?

Full sun

Frost Tolerant

Is Spagetti Squash frost tolerant?

No

Spacing

How much space does Spagetti Squash need?

Roughly 60cm apart

Planting

When should I plant Spagetti Squash?

Spagetti Squash is a warm season crop that is best planted in spring once the danger of frost has passed. 

Seeds are quick to germinate and can be direct sown once the soil has warmed to roughly 20°C (68°F).  

Feeding

What do I feed Spagetti Squash?

A regular application of organic fertiliser throughout the season. 

Harvesting

When can I harvest Spagetti Squash?

Mature fruit is generally ready for harvest when it has completely changed from green to an orange colour and the vine that is attached to the fruit begins to brown and die back. 

When ripe, your finger nail should not be able to pierce through the skin. 

Cut off the the Squash from the vine, leaving at least a few centimeters of stalk attached. 

Allow the skins to harden by placing the squash in a sunny spot (below 30°C/86°F) for a week before storing them. 

 

Pests

What pests does Spagetti Squash get?

Aphids, Armyworm, Cabbage Looper, Cucumber Beetle, Cutworm, Flea Beetle, Squash Bug, Squash Vine Borer, Thrips, Spider Mite, 28 Spotted Ladybug 

Diseases

What diseases does Spagetti Squash get?

Leaf Blight and Leaf Spot, Downy Mildew, Powdery Mildew, Fusarium Crown and Root Rot, Gummy Stem Blight, Verticillium Wilt, Bacterial Wilt, Aster Yellows, Mosaic Virus, Phytophthora Blight 

Notes

Is there anything else I need to know about Spagetti Squash?

Spagetti Squash vines as well as their fruit will grow quite large. Trellising is a great way to save space and will also reduce the incidence of powdery mildew due to increased air-flow. 

Spagetti Squash fruits can be quite heavy, so it's important that your trellis can handle the weight of the fruit. Occasionally the fruit may need some support so that it does not weigh too heavily on the vine.  

If you have ample space, spagetti squash can grow along the ground the same way as a pumpkin vine.

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